Tag Archives: NCAA

Tag, NOT IT!

In normal times, pre covid-19 this would be a heavy month of college football coaches bumping into players at their high school. The infamous evaluations period that was scheduled for April 15 through May 31, 2020. Unfortunately the video conferencing has become the new normal to be introduced to coaches and take over on campus visits. However, is this really a substitute for recruiting?
Most likely not but better than nothing or the annoying list almost every college buys to send you camp invites or to purchase season tickets. Let’s face it the university wants your dollars even if you never make it to the fields or courts.

The odds of a high school athlete completing 3-5 years of a sport are truly against the odds. Primarily due to the rigorous schedules and heavy work load in the classrooms. Early enrollment and summer school is now a must and burnout ensues for the guys that were all hype and can NOT cut the mustard next level. The 18-25 new faces every year make it challenging in addition to the transfer portal as more experienced plays are determined to win a job by any means necessary. The deck is stacked against student athletes that have little discipline. A wake up to be in the trainers office by 5am and practices at 6am with meetings can last past noon. So that reason you are there called a post secondary education can last well past 8pm. In addition tutors and a good nights rest. Yep, the rigors of a student athlete is cumbersome and complicated.So no social life outside of team and heavy demands to be in tip top shape to be the next man or woman up.

So how do you get to post secondary education?
Well for starters it is NOT some trainer, handler, coach or someone else tagging you name, profile or video(s) daily or hourly to colleges. Some of the biggest misconceptions is that individual position coaches actually read, view or respond to emails, IMs, DMs, etc. The big schools have people on staff to filter the noise, spam or content considered junk. So, if you really think that low, low payment of $239 a month or more has value, RETHINK IT! The recruiting companies, APPS, websites and trainers are out to make money! its their business to make money and blow smoke up your ass! That is a guarantee. 99.9% sure if you stop payment, stop attending or rip up a contract the HYPE they call recruiting goes away like dust in the wind. If you ain’t paying you ain’t getting hyped any more.

Years ago coaches had a long tenure and players were cultivated organically. Eventually the pressure to win became increasingly more demanding to attract paying students. The University of Miami is a prime example in football and UNLV in basketball. The wins, bowl appearances and limelight causes HYPE and REVENUES. The coaches have gone from $25,000 to $300,000 in annual salaries in the past decade. So do you really think they are concerned with being tagged on social media?
The smart answer is NO because they want to keep their jobs as they are well paying nowadays. The modern day HYPE in recent years dwarfs the past decade whenless communication was transmitted and of more value or quality.

Fast forward to 2015 and the plethora of backyard gyms, trainers, handlers and boosters willing to pay to play. Even the high and mighty Hollywood actors that scammed their way into elite schools. Some musicians children or former professional players all because the Universities knew they could leverage donor monies. Yep, fields, field houses, practice facilities and buildings need to be erected so if you have a fat wallet or sizable bank account odds are you might be recruited as opposed to someone deserving. The coaches reliability on word of mouth now has red tape associated to an offer or camp invite. Some schools will even make sure a player or two from the local market are on the roster to sell the fan base season tickets. Yes it happens and why many colleges align with a handful of dominate or winning programs so they can say we did our due diligence when in reality its a favor to save face.

So the biggest resolve is are we making this more difficult or complicated than it needs to be and the answer is YES, emphatically! The offers are just a way to get you to pay for a summer camp and prove yourselves. These camps are where they can eyeball and get true measurements rather than rely on self reported height, weight and statistics.
Are you really 6’3″ and measure barely measure 6 foot.
Is that 4.62 40 yard das a true assessment or is it more like 4.95-5.10?
Are you 100+ tackles true and if so why during team camp are you NOT making plays?
After all that is the medical record checks for not only broken bones but concussions or learning deficiencies. If you can not learn in the classroom, how are you going to be eligible?
College board exams of ACT and SAT need to be verified alongside a high school transcript with the intention of are you going to be eligible on game day?

So Tag, you NOT it has meaningful purpose, wake the fuck up and spend your hard earned monies wisely! The going collusion rate for a position trainer is $499 a month with a 12 month contract, rain, shine, snow or pandemic. So for you non mathematicians that adds up to $5,988 per annum or $23,952 if you get suckered for 4 years. The same sum most post secondary students pay for local tuition to get that education and can enjoy the college experience without having to sacrifice their time or bodies of potential life long injuries.

Parents don’t believe the HYPE as no one person can guarantee a division one scholarship no matter how many social media tags they post about your child! The monies you pay are to a business person to line their pockets. Some will resort to placing advertisements in magazines, host a podcast or even buy air time waits for no one! Hustle your ass bou on the radio to create HYPE on their paying clients. In fact there are a handful of subscription based media advertisers that have ranking lists and will write a story on your children if you have been paying for a few years. Yes the click bait is real annoying as film does NOT lie but trainers do. The basic reason is so they can hustle you for the almighty American dollars once a month for 12 months! As for 7 on 7 guys, that is the ultimate hustle for monies when colleges do not even care or plan to watch that film as its on air or not true football. Better time and monies could be spent on hoops for a vertical or rugby for tackling and even track and field for speed. 7v7 is a money maker for HYPE guys and only a couple do it for the cost of the helmet and uniform. A vast majority do it for revenues like $60,000 per team deposited into their pockets, especially the cash based hustlers!

It truly is a game so Tag, NOT IT!
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The Ones That Got Away

The Ones That Got Away
The Best Colorado High School Football Players To Go Out-of-State
Monday, February 22, 2016

By Joe Landers

Over the last 25 years, Colorado has lost a number of its best in-state high school football players to out-of-state programs. The intention here is to compile a list of the best who got away. These are Colorado high schoolers who went on to highly productive college or pro careers. On the surface, it’s hard to imagine why one of the equivalent in-state schools couldn’t have kept the player in-state. Going deeper, there are probably very valid reasons in every case as to why the player left the state.

Maybe Calais Campbell was headed to Miami regardless of who offered him. Is it possible that Gary Barnett didn’t want 5’6” Cory Ross and Colorado was the only viable in-state option for Ross at the time? (Ross went on to play for the Ravens.) Maybe the Denney brothers saw no in-state alternative to BYU. (Both went on to play in the NFL.) It could be that Cole Manhart grew two inches and 60 pounds after he got to Kearney. (He was PSq’d by the Raiders in 2015.) I’m guessing McCartney and Bruce felt good enough about their QB options (and their option offenses) that Musgrave never got a sniff in-state.

It’s hard to imagine each of the below future NFLers not making CU, CSU, and Air Force better. There are so many mitigating circumstances that affect every single recruit decision to leave the state and so many reasons every single evaluation by in-state coaching staffs result in them not pursuing an in-state recruit – changing coaching staffs, recruit wants to be somewhere warm, playing time, bigger stage, better alternatives, scheme, the list goes on and on. Is there an equivalent in-state option to Michigan for Carlo Kemp? Only he, his family, and the in-state coaching staffs know if it was ever realistic. Was there a viable in-state alternative for JoJo Domann? Could CU or CSU have done anything to keep Matt Lynch from leaving for UCLA? Did the CU or CSU staffs feel like they had better alternatives to each or did they put their all into keeping this year’s cream of the crop? (For the record, even these three high school greats aren’t on this list because they haven’t done anything in college yet.)

The key assumption with regards to the lists you’ll see below is that each of them could’ve made their in-state equivalent better. It was their choice to leave, the in-state college coaches’ choice to let them walk, or a combination thereof. For example, while he’s a lesser known name, Eaglecrest FS Aaron Swift had a great career at South Dakota from 2010-2014. His in-state equivalent would’ve been Northern Colorado. It’s probably not a stretch to say he would’ve been an upgrade for UNC – Swift led USD in PBUs twice, had a 60-yd pick-six, and started four years in a row (>75% of USD’s games). Thinking of big names, Lamarr Houston’s only in-state options comparable to Texas in 2007 were Colorado State and Colorado – if either could’ve found a way to keep him, he would’ve made both considerably better. Another lesser known name would be Tommy Connors. Like Swift, he never played in the NFL, but he was an outstanding three-year starting SS at Southeastern Louisiana. Northern Colorado was his only in-state comp at the time. Connors led SELa in TFLs, tackles, INTs, and FFs at various points in his career. There’s no question he would’ve made UNC better from 2007-2010.

You’ll see three lists below. The first is of those who have completed their college eligibility and would’ve offered a considerable upgrade for their in-state equivalents. The second is of those who just completed their eligibility this season and concluded an outstanding college career on the field. Lastly, the third is of those who are still in college and based on their on-field production so far, there’s no question they would’ve provided an upgrade at their equivalent P5 school (CU), their equivalent non-P5 I-A school (CSU/AFA), their equivalent I-AA school (UNC), or their equivalent D2 school (Pueblo, Mesa, Adams State, Western, Fort Lewis, Mines). Each list is sorted by their last year of college eligibility.

College Eligibility Completed Before 2016 – Colorado H.S. Football Players

In almost every case on the above list, whether they played at USC or Nebraska-Kearney, the future NFLers on the list would’ve made CU or CSU better. In most cases, even those that didn’t play in the NFL had such great college careers (e.g., Connors, Swift, Preston, Rufran, Theret) that they also would’ve been upgrades for their in-state equivalents.

College Eligibility Completed In 2016 – The Best from Colorado Who Played Out-of-State

The bar is high here. LT Clarke (6’3/295) started four years in a row at tackle for Hawaii. (Starting over 75% of the team’s game qualifies as a year started.) WR McCaffrey (6’2/195) started three of his four years at Duke. DE Yarbrough (6’3/251) not only started three of his four years at Wyoming, but he led the team in sacks all four years, led the team in TFLs three years, led the team in FRs and FFs in 2013, and led the team in QBHs in 2014. To say he has a high motor and is active would be an understatement. DT Sheridan (6’4/280) started his final two years at Montana State, led the team in FFs in 2014, and led the team in QBHs and blocked kicks in 2015. DE Obi (6’3/250) started his two years at Missouri Western State after a CC xfer. CB Brown (6’1/185) started two of his four years at Augustana (SD), lettered all four, led the team in INTs twice, and led the team in PBUs in 2013.

Between I-A, I-AA, and II-A, there are 35 more Colorado high school players who are concluding their athletic eligibility by May 2016. I don’t know if the other 35 started out more highly ranked, but these six clearly stand out based on their on-field productivity in college.

College Eligibility Remaining – The Best from Colorado Playing Out-of-State

The bar is also incredibly high to make this list. OL Skipper (6’10/331) has started at right and left tackle in two of his three seasons at Arkansas. OG Kozan (6’4/300) has started two of his three seasons at Guard for Auburn. Many may scoff at Eastern New Mexico, but WR Johnson (6’5/190) has started three seasons in a row (no redshirt year) and he’s been explosive with TD catches of 70, 73, and 78 yards. RB Christian McCaffrey (6’0/201) needs no introduction. P J.K. Scott (6’5/198) has started two years in a row for Alabama and is widely regarded as one of the top punters in the country. OL Cummings (6’6/314) started most of his RS Fr year in 2014 and all of 2015 at left tackle for Wyoming. RB Paris (5’10/198) has started his first two years in a row at Black Hills State and shown breakaway speed with a 64-yd TD catch. FS Wingard started every game as a true freshman for Wyoming in 2015, led the team in tackles, and made the national FWAA All-Freshman team. There are 227 more former Colorado high school footballers playing at the I-A, I-AA, and II-A levels out-of-state. There may be others who have reached heights similar to what these eight have so far in college. If we’ve missed someone, please let us know.

Conclusion

Part of the issue with keeping recruits in Colorado is limited choices. We’re not Ohio where there are 30 options: eight I-A choices (1 P5, 7 non-P5), two I-AA, nine II-A, and eleven III-A. We’re not California or Florida with seven I-A options and four I-AA options. We’re not North Carolina with six I-A, eight I-AA, and thirteen II-A options. We’re Colorado. One P5 option, two non-P5 I-A options (one of which is Air Force), one I-AA option, and six D2 options – 10 total. See how we compare in terms of in-state options to keep stars in-state.

College Football Schools – By State, Divisions I-A, I-AA, and II-A (FBS, FCS, and D2)

In Colorado, it sure looks like we’re in the same boat as Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon, and Utah – two or less (viable) I-A options and very few I-AA/D2 options. I have to believe the sentiments about keeping kids in-state is very similar in those states.

Of the many reasons in-state recruits don’t stay, I would guess that part of it’s that young men want to see different parts of the country and explore beyond Colorado. Some want to be part of the pomp and circumstance in the SEC. Maybe some want to return to a state where they lived as a kid (e.g., Montana). Others might want to see what it’s like to live in California. Regardless of the recruit reasons or the college coach reasons, if you’re pulling for any in-state teams, it’s extremely frustrating to hear stories of great local high school players not even getting a call from CU, CSU, UNC, Pueblo, Mesa, Adams State, Fort Lewis, or Western. (I’d put Air Force and Mines on a different scale due to the rigorous academics and clearly defined career trajectory.)

To see college football wallow in its current state here in Colorado is not easy. To watch the best talent leave means that there’s likely no end in sight any time soon. How can it be cheaper to offer a full ride to some kid from Louisiana compared to a local kid? It seems like the money would go further with local kids, but maybe that’s oversimplifying the finances of building with out-of-state talent. Hopefully, going forward, in-state college coaches will find a way to keep the best Colorado recruits and allow local fans to pull for a local winning team composed of local recruits.